Swedish Hard Rockers Graveyard’s “Goliath” and Capitalist Freedom

Here’s the music video for “Goliath” (2012) by Graveyard. Is thish song not more Lenin than Lenin even, in its distinction between “formal” and “actual” freedom? And is thish not precisely because of its 70s retro feel?

The wolves are at your door
Dressed like sheep.
Trying hard to hide the blood
To hide the blood from the crowd.
They are trying to sell slavery as a dream to chase.
Driven by fears, consumer words
No way to see their hoax.
They are listening, they are watching,
They wanna know what we do.
They are faking our freedom,
Hoping we believe it’s true.

The world is full of snakes,
Whispering in your ear.
A stream of seducing words from a cloven tongue.
They are trying to sell slavery as a dream to chase
Driven by fears, consumer words,
No way to see their hoax.
Fences at the border,
Dividing the world in two.
Have-nots feed the have-lots,
Obeying the market rules.

The rats are spreading ṗlague,
No stopping the disease.
Their rotten dirty bite, infecting the whole world.
They are trying to sell slavery as a dream to chase.
Driven by fears, consumer words,
No way to see their hoax.

– Graveyard, “Goliath”

“Freedom yes, but for WHOM? To do WHAT?”

– Vladimir Lenin

This is what Lenin’s obsessive tirades against “formal” freedom are about, therein resides their “rational kernel” which is worth saving today: when he emphasizes that there is no “pure” democracy, that we should always ask who does a freedom under consideration serve, which is its role in the class struggle, his point is precisely to maintain the possibility of the TRUE radical choice. This is what the distinction between “formal” and “actual” freedom ultimately amounts to: “formal” freedom is the freedom of choice WITHIN the coordinates of the existing power relations, while “actual” freedom designates the site of an intervention which undermines these very coordinates. In short, Lenin’s point is not to limit freedom of choice, but to maintain the fundamental Choice — when Lenin asks about the role of a freedom within the class struggle, what he is asking is precisely: “Does this freedom contribute to or constrain the fundamental revolutionary Choice?”
– Slavoj Žižek

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