It’s Sundown on Purim: Time for Hamantaschen and Goliath!

It’s just gone sundown on Purim, and we’ve already been into the hamantaschen which I had made earlier this afternoon:

Hamantaschen

Pretty good for a goy boy, eh? These hamantaschen are fairly traditional, made with a sweet poppy-seed-based filling. According to rumour, consuming too many of these hamantaschen can give you an opium high. However, hamantaschen are quite filling, so I can’t imagine that anybody would ever be able to consume enough of them for the residual opiates in poppy seeds to take effect. It would be far easier just to put your poppy seeds in a coffee grinder, give it a good tamper, and then pop it through your espresso machine. A sip of this and you won’t be able to distinguish Arur Haman (“Cursed is Haman”) from Baruch Mordecai (“Blessed be Mordecai”). Perhaps that accounts for what the author of the prologue to Job wrote?

Hamantaschen or oznei Haman (“Haman’s ears”) are named after (the ears of) the defeated enemy of the Jews, Haman, who is the main baddie in the book of Esther – which you should read through at the festival of Purim.

Another fine Purim tradition is the Purim Play or Purim Shpiel. Many of the biblical stories have been adapted into Purim Plays, including – of course – Esther, but also Joseph, the Akedah (Binding of Isaac), Samson and Delilah, and … David and Goliath.

Ibiblio.org makes available a Yiddish Purim Play, Golias Shpil (גאָליאַס-שפּיל), which is accompanied by a 90s-sounding midi file:

Shtil, shtil, shtil,
Roysht nit vi ayn mil,
Hert nor oys “Golias-shpil”.
Shat, nit shrayt,
Shtiler zayt.
Ir yidn, ir kristn,
Ir daytshishe layt.
Mit a groys gevakh
Tsu hern mayn shprakh,
Mit a klorn zinen,
Mit a reynem gedank,
Mit a tifn gefil
Tsu hern “Golias-shpil”.
Hert nor uf tsu brumen
Un oykh tsu shumen,
Ot do vet bald der aktor araynkumen.

Find out what happens at the end of this Golias Shpil here.

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