Salem-News Defends Existence of Giants!

An article in Salem-News.com, ‘The Enigma of the Giants’ (28 February 2011), defends the existence of Giants. The online newspaper is based in Salem, Oregon (not to be confused with Salem, Massachussets). The article, by Jim D. Adams, canvases some of the reasons why we should accept the existence of Giants:

  • the possible genetic connection of ‘Giant skeletons’ such as Gigantopithecus and Meganthropus with homo sapiens;
  • the Australian discovery of what appears to be tools so big they could only be used by Giants; and
  • persistent rumours of Giants dwelling in remote places – just over the hill over there. 

These are the kind of reasons that have been put forward consistently during the past 2,500 years of recorded gigantology.

They are also reasons which, historically, have been highly effective in maintaining a popular belief in Giants. But, for a strongly Christian people such as the population of Salem, Oregon, the most convincing tactic is the article’s depiction of a “primitive” facing the Giant Gigantopithecus or Meganthropus, which unsubtly transforms a very familiar biblical scene:

David and Gigantopithecus?
David and Gigantopithecus?

Amusingly, the article even makes a general appeal to the Dead Sea Scrolls, probably based on the widespread yet false understanding that the Scrolls somehow “prove” the truth of the Bible’s contents:

Like the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the modern science of archeology and anthropology is finding that ancient legends have a foundation in fact.

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7 thoughts on “Salem-News Defends Existence of Giants!

  1. The consensus of the impact of the Dead Sea Scrolls is thus:
    Dead Sea Scrolls: Dramatic Evidence for the Reliability of Messianic Prophecy
    The Dead Sea Scrolls comprise the oldest group of Old Testament manuscripts ever found, dating back to 100–200 B.C. This is dramatic, because we now have absolute evidence that Messianic prophecies contained in today’s Old Testament (both Jewish and Christian) are the same Messianic prophecies that existed prior to the time Jesus walked on this earth. It goes without saying, manuscript reliability and textual criticism have taken cosmic steps forward! Check it out – There is no question that Jesus Christ was the Messiah that the Jews were waiting for.

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    • Hi Etruscan. This is certainly not the “consensus” of any critical biblical scholars. Yes, the Old Testament was written before Jesus lived, however, there was never really much doubt about this. But there are no “Messianic prophecies” in the Old Testament. None of the 39 references to a “messiah” (‘anointed person’) refer to anything but an anointed king, priest, or (less frequently) a prophet. What’s more, none of these ‘anointed persons’ refer to anybody prophesied to come in the distant future. There simply are no ‘Messianic prophecies’ in the Old Testament which could have been ‘fulfilled’ in Jesus.

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      • The reality is that the Dead Sea Scrolls are made to be whatever the beholder wants them to be. This is a general tendency of people with spiritual leanings, who prefer the power of faith to the world of science. If one peruses the various opinions of the implications of the Dead Sea Scrolls, there is an equal division of those who feel it confirms Biblical scriptures, and those who feel it doesn’t.

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    • Etruscan what is your view on the possibility that Jesus’ followers may have made a deliberate and conscious decision to fit descriptions of Jesus’ activities within the existing Messianic prophecies to promote Jesus as the ‘true’ Messiah? – As opposed to all the competing false Messiahs that were around at the same time that the Bible takes great pains to warn us about.
      Also I think there are rather a lot of Jews that would disagree with your last statement (other than the Jews for Jesus churches). So ‘no question’ is stretching it, don’t you think?

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      • I’m sorry, but some of the prophecies where so loose even I could have fulfilled them (had I lived in the 1st century). On the upside, at least Jesus didn’t make any prophecies that never came true- oh, wait a sec…

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  2. You’re right, he didn’t. Check again, trying not to pick and choose only those interpretations that fit your personal world view.

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