Mark Goodacre’s Podcast on the Walking Talking Cross of the Gospel of Peter: Or, When is a Walking Talking Cross not a Walking Talking Cross?

Mark Goodacre provides a second podcast on the second-century apocryphal Gospel, the Gospel of Peter. In an earlier podcast, Mark provided an overview of the Gospel of Peter. In this podcast, Mark discusses the most unusual aspect of the Gospel of Peter: that a walking, talking cross follows Jesus out from his tomb at his resurrection, and is heard (not seen) to answer the voice of God from heaven while walking about on earth.

As those of you who have seen Mark’s 2011 SBL International paper or who have read his blog posts might anticipate, Mark finds the narrative highly problematic. In his podcast, he sets out some of the oddities in the story which make it difficult to understand (quite apart from a cross walking around), and provides reasons to support a conjectural emendation of “cross” to “the crucified one” (i.e. Jesus).

It’s a convincing emendation, and his informative podcast includes such droll observations as this one:

I think the advantages of my reading, of my suggestion, do outweigh any of the possible negatives. Probably more important than anything else is that, in my reading, Jesus is not upstaged, at his own resurrection, by his cross.

- Mark Goodacre, “NT Pod 56: The Walking, Talking Cross in the Gospel of Peter”

For more on the issue of the walking talking cross, see:

NT Blog, “A Walking, Talking Cross or the Walking, Talking Crucified One?”, 18 October 2010

NT Blog, “SBL International Paper Proposals Accepted”, 8 February 2011

NT Blog, “The Giant Jesus and the Walking, Talking Cross”, 26 July 2011

Remnant of Giants, “Jesus was a Giant – But Let’s Be Reasonable: There was no walking, talking cross!”, 28 July 2011

For my proposed explanation why Jesus is a Giant in the Gospel of Peter, see:

Remnant of Giants,Why Jesus was a Giant: The Messianic Interpretation of Psalm 18(19) in Gosp. Peter 10.38-42“, 14 September 2011

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Filed under Ancient Jewish texts, Biblical Exegesis

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